For our Volunteer Spotlight this month, we thought we’d share a great program benefiting our partners at Reid Park Academy.   The Promising Pages partnership came about via a placement by the Junior League of Charlotte who, along with Council for Children’s Rights, provides volunteers and support to Reid Park Academy

By Whitney Jackson, Project Manager, Reid Park Academy Family Center
 

We’re excited to recognize a great program that has positively impacted the Reid Park Academy students.

Promising Pages is a local non-profit agency with a mission to level the playing field and offer all kids a fair shot at life by

JLC Volunteer Jennifer Keen (left) with Promising Pages’ Founder/Executive Director Kristina Cruise (center) and Erma the Bookworma

JLC Volunteer Jennifer Keen (left) with Promising Pages’ Founder/Executive Director Kristina Cruise (center) and Erma the Bookworma

giving them the tools they need to succeed at an early age. These tools are books, a love of reading, and a healthy self-esteem that comes with book ownership.

The Promising Pages staff and volunteers are currently working with Reid Park Academy’s First and Second graders to host Magic Book Parties eight times throughout the year.  During these Magic Book Parties, students are visited by Promising Pages’ mascot Erma the Bookworma, listen to her read “Luckier than the Luckiest,” and are able get to take home a book specially giftwrapped for each student.  According to Kristina Cruise, Executive Director and Junior League of Charlotte Member, Promising Pages is “so thrilled to be part of the [Reid Park Academy] family!”

Moreover, older students benefit from Promising Pages’ curriculum through the club it hosts during ARK @ the Park Family Night events.

Reid Park Academy’s partnership with Promising Pages aligns with the school’s goal to increase the literacy rates of all students and nurture a life-long love of reading. Promising Pages will help Reid Park Academy celebrate Dr. Seuss’ birthday on March 2nd and will graduate all of our bookworms on May 15th.

“By the time the school year is over, each child should have 25 or more bookworm books to call their very own. Every book they read brings them one step closer to being what they want to be when they grow up, which is the same thing they wrote down on the inside of their very own Magic Book. Readers become leaders,” said Cruise.

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